Read Puvungna for Free!

Download a free copy of Puvungna, written by the author when he was just 14 years old for his 9th grade English class at Long Beach, California’s Stanford Junior High School.

Puvungna, the book by Daniel R StielPuvungna is a story about two young brothers who travel back in time and discover an ancient Indian village along the shores of a Southern California beach and the terrifying secret behind its disappearance over five hundred years ago.

Puvungna is inspired by the true story of a lost village that was once populated by the indigenous Tongva people and the artifacts the author found while exploring the vacant land near his home in Seal Beach.

You will meet Chinigchinich and the people who called Puvungna their home, and experience how they lived before their land was conquered, their spirituality, and the events that changed a long-forgotten history which took place at the village.

The Tongva, which means “people of the earth” in their native language, called Southern California their home for many thousands of years before the arrival of the Europeans.
Believed to be the birthplace of Chinigchinich, a prophet and the spiritual leader of the native Tongva, Puvungna is considered sacred by indigenous people. It is also believed by many remaining modern-day Tongva people to be the place of creation.

The last remains of the village of Puvungna is located less than a mile from the Pacific Ocean on the campus of present day California State University, Long Beach, along the banks of a once flourishing creek that today is little more than a drainage ditch paved over with concrete.

Click here to download a copy of Puvungna. https://goo.gl/JDJCWq

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American Indian tradition celebrated at Puvungna this weekend

California State University, Long Beach’s annual Pow Wow, an American Indian social celebration, returns to the campus’ central quad this Saturday and Sunday, March 7 – 8, 2009. The largest spring event of its kind in Southern California, the Pow Wow at Cal State Long Beach is focused on displaying the university’s strong American Indian presence.

Cal State University Long Beach is the present-day site of Puvungna, the sacred ancient village.

The two-day event, which will feature American Indian dancing, arts, crafts and food begins at 11 AM each day and runs until 10 PM on Saturday and 7 PM on Sunday. In addition to contests and inter-tribal dancing, there will be Gourd dancing with Dancer Registration closing at 2 PM on Saturday, March 7. All dancers and drums are invited.

Native foods such as mutton and beef stew, Navajo tacos, fry bread and Indian burgers will be on sale at the event, and American Indian vendors will be selling both traditional and contemporary American Indian art.

The Pow Wow is co-sponsored by the American Indian studies department, the American Indian Student Council, the Native American Alumni and Friends Chapter, the Division of Student Services, Student Life and Development, 49er Shop Inc. and Associated Students Inc.

Admission and parking are free. We strongly recommend spectators to bring folding chairs.

For more information, visit http://csulb.edu/powwow or contact Anna Nazarian-Peters at (562) 985-8528. You can also reach the event organizers by email at powwow@csulb.edu.

Prospector Pete opens dialogue about racism

The Daily 49er, the student newspaper of Cal State Long Beach, publishes an editorial on the forgotten history of the schools mascot, Prospector Pete.

The paper writes, Here on campus, a symbol of California’s horridly racist past dances around in costume. To many people of color, the Prospector Pete mascot and the ominous miner statue on the upper campus, combined with the “49er” school spirit iconography — emblazoned on everything from coffee mugs to our beloved sports teams — represent a violent history. During the Gold Rush, Anglo forty-niners wiped out 80 percent of the American Indian population. 

Read the editorial Here and give us your opinion.

Autographed Copies of Puvungna Now Available

Due to popular demand, the author is making autographed copies of the first edition of Puvungna available for purchase.  For more details, see the special listing on eBay.com.

This special offer includes free shipping to the U.S. (shipping worldwide is also available) for just $12.99. 

To order, Click Here or go to eBay (search for Puvungna).

Puvungna, the book, now available at Amazon.com

Puvungna, the novella written by Daniel Ross Stiel is now available for reading at Amazon.com.
Puvungna is a story about two young brothers who travel back in time and discover an ancient Indian village along the shores of a Southern California beach and the secret behind its disappearance over five hundred years ago.
Puvungna was inspired by the true story of a long-forgotten village that was once populated by the indigenous Tongva people of Southern California. Today, the last remnants of the village of Puvungna is located near the Pacific Ocean on the campus of present day California State University, Long Beach.
To review or order Puvungna on Amazon, Click Here.

Puvungna – the new novella by Daniel R Stiel is released

Puvungna - The story of a lost Indian Village

Puvungna - The story of a lost Indian Village

“Puvungna,” the new novella by Daniel Ross Stiel, was released today.  Available at selected booksellers, including Amazon.com, the fiction story is about two young boys who travel back in time and discover an Indian village along the shores of a Southern California beach.

To order a copy, visit Amazon.com.

“Whispers,” a film about the Tongva, Chumash and Juaneno

Bringing The Circle Together presents a screening of ‘Whispers.’  The film presents a documentary on three Native American cultures of Southern California: Tongva, Chumash, and Juaneno. 

 

·         Date: Thursday, February 19, 2009 at 7pm

·         Where: Democracy Forum, 111 North Central Ave, downtown Los Angeles (across from the Japanese American National Museum)

·         Time: Doors open at 6:30pm.

 

Chumash filmmaker George Angelo, Jr. interviews and documents three Indigenous cultures of Southern California: the Chumash, Tongva/Gabrieleno, and Juaneno. This extraordinary documentary presents their history and living traditions, with a special focus on rock art, the tomol, and dolphin dancers. Guests include filmmaker George Angelo, Jr.

 

For more information go to www.myspace.com/nafilmseries

Sponsored by The Japanese American National Museum, Hecho de Mano, InterTribal Entertainment, and Nahui Ohlin